How to Make 3D Printed Parts Fit Together

One of the great things about 3D printing is that you can print an entire model in one go. The typical example is the fully assembled “print-in-place” ball bearing as shown in the image above. This is printed in one go, no assembly required. However, the tolerances are pretty small which requires a well-tuned 3D printer. In this article, I describe how I tune my machine for perfect fit.

Continue reading How to Make 3D Printed Parts Fit Together

10 Ways to Improve your Technical blog – Review of Technical Blogging by Antonio Cangiano

There are many tips out there to improve your blog. There are just as many people out there who claim to have found the one true way to maintain a blog. Over the last 10+ years I’ve run a blog in some form or other, I’ve read it all. So why would I read yet another book that claims to offer the magic formula for technical blogging?

Continue reading 10 Ways to Improve your Technical blog – Review of Technical Blogging by Antonio Cangiano

The Jekyll migration cheat sheet (make #3)

Jekyll is a static site generator. It allows you to run a blog on a minimal server with minimal security worries and no spamming. Because it’s all based on files, it tends to be a bit more technical than blogging in WordPress. I’ve previously written about Jekyll, but now it was time to actually migrate a site from WordPress to Jekyll.

Continue reading The Jekyll migration cheat sheet (make #3)

Starter’s Guide to 3D Printing: “So I’ve Build a 3D Printer, Now What?” (make #2)

Over the Christmas break I built a RepRap 3D printer. Everything went well until it was finished. The information on getting started with actual printing is very fragmented and all over the place. So here’s a short guide for any budding RepRappers who can’t wait to get started.

Continue reading Starter’s Guide to 3D Printing: “So I’ve Build a 3D Printer, Now What?” (make #2)

A maker's journal